Review: Steve Jobs Insanely Great

Steve Jobs Insanely Great graphic novel reviewed by a Book BoyTitle: Steve Jobs: Insanely Great

Author + Illustrator: Jessie Hartland

Publisher: Random House

About the book: This graphic novel is about the life of the creator of Apple technology, Steve Jobs. I thought that it was really clever putting it into graphic novel format because it makes it easier to understand and it makes a biography fun.

What I thought: I loved all the little illustrations in the book and how it was set out in different chapters for each few years of his life. I learnt a lot that I didn’t know about Steve Jobs and I found the information very easy to understand.

I would recommend this book for ages 11+ as there are references to adult themes. I think that kids who are interested in electronics and the history behind computers would really like this book.

I found Steve Jobs to be an interesting and even inspirational person.

Buy Steve Jobs: Insanely Great here.

Review: The Turners

The Turners by Mick Elliott reviewed by a kidTitle: The Turners

Author: Mick Elliott

Publisher: Lothian Books

I’m handing over to Book Boy Junior (aged 9) for this review.

About the book: Leo Lennox has an epic problem. You’d think that growing a tail in the middle of the school library would be the worst thing that could happen to you, but Leo is about to discover that things can always get worse and a whole lot weirder… (in a really funny way).

What I thought: Leo is funny – he’s not crazy, in fact, he’s sensible (kind of), but the way he thinks is funny. He’s surprised when a family secret comes out on his birthday, and the story is really adventurous.

I thought this book was really exciting because there were always shape-shifters and different surprises just around the corner.

Mick Elliott has a great imagination and I look forward to reading the next book in this series.

I recommend this book for kids aged 8-11.

Buy The Turners here.

Review: The Outsiders

The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton reviewed by a kidTitle: The Outsiders

Author: S. E. Hinton

Publisher: Puffin Modern Classics

About the book: The Socs are the rich kids, the Greasers are from the poor side of town. The Socs’s idea of having a good time is beating up greasers like Ponyboy, who lives with his two brothers. Ponyboy knows what to expect and knows he can count on his brothers and friends, but one night things go too far.

What I thought: Even though this book was written in 1967, it is still a great book that I would recommend to everyone. It’s about gangs in the 1960s and I could really connect to the characters because they felt so real.

I really liked how well it was written and how even in the darkest of scenes there was still humour. I was surprised to learn that S.E. Hinton was only 17 when this book was published.

I would recommend this book for kids 12+ because it has some grown-up themes, violence, some coarse language and sad scenes.

Buy The Outsiders here.

Review: Ranger’s Apprentice: The Tournament at Gorlan

The Tournament At Gorlan reviewed by a kidTitle: Ranger’s Apprentice: The Tournament at Gorlan

Author: John Flanagan

Publisher: Penguin Random House

About the book: This book is a prequel to the very popular Ranger’s Apprentice series. It is about Crowley as a young ranger who is trying to thwart the plans of the evil Lord Morgarath. He is accompanied by Halt, a gruff Hibernian, and picks up other rangers along the way.

What I thought: I thought this book was really good. It keeps the same qualities of the other Ranger’s Apprentice books – adventure, good vocabulary, humour and a good story. I have often been disappointed by prequels, but this one really stood out. I really liked finding out more about Halt before he became a Ranger. You could start the series with this book, or you could read it after you’ve read all the others.

I would recommend it for good readers of 8+ and, really, anyone who enjoys a good fantasy adventure would love this book.

Buy Ranger’s Apprentice: The Tournament at Gorlan here.

Review: My Life And Other Massive Mistakes

My Life and other massive mistakes review by kidTitle: My life and other massive mistakes

Author: Tristan Bancks

Illustrator: Gus Gordon

Publisher: Random House Australia

About the bookMy life and other massive mistakes is a series of short stories, much like the Just series by Andy Griffiths. Tom Weekly is the main character in these stories and some of the hilarious antics he gets up to include: extracting his teeth for money, helping his Pop escape a nursing home and using someone else’s nits to try and shut down his school.

What I thought: This is an extremely funny book by a fantastic author. I particularly like how the stories are funny, flow well and are easy to read. I would recommend this book for ages 8+, though good readers of 7+ would also enjoy it. I give this book 8/10 and am looking forward to reading others in the series.

Buy My Life And Other Massive Mistakes here.

Review: Countdown To Danger: Shockwave

Countdown to danger Jack Heath review by kidTitle: Countdown to Danger: Shockwave

Author: Jack Heath

Publisher: Scholastic Australia

About the book: This is a Choose Your Own Adventure book, part of the Countdown to Danger series. The story begins in a surf camp, and the reader has decisions to make at the end of each chapter. The book is written in second person, making the reader the main character of the story.

What I thought: The book is written well (I think books like this would be hard to write!) and I read it several times for different storylines. I thought that some of the decisions you had to make were quite difficult and it was a fun book – almost like playing a game.

I would recommend the book for ages 7+ – I think boys would enjoy these storylines the most. Kids who like adventure and making up their own stories will really like this book.

Buy Countdown To Danger: Shockwave here.

Review: The Impossible Quest

The Impossible Quest reviewed by a kidTitle: The Impossible Quest series

Escape from Wolfhaven Castle

Wolves of Witchwood

The Beast of Blackmoor Bog

The Drowned Kingdom

Battle Of The Heroes

Author: Kate Forsyth

Publisher: Scholastic Australia

About the books: ‘The Impossible Quest’ is a series of books about four children, Tom, Elanor, Quinn and Sebastian, who must go on an impossible quest to save their people from the wicked bog-men. They must find four items: a unicorn’s horn, a griffin’s feather, a dragons tooth and a sea-serpents scale, to awaken the heroes that will save them.

What I thought: I thought that this was a really adventurous series that had me on the edge of my seat at every page. I loved how descriptive and interesting the books were, and the touches of humour. I liked the series so much I went as one of the characters (Tom) for Book Week last year!

I really loved the books and would recommend the series for ages 8+.

Buy The Impossible Quest series.

Review: The Book Thief

The Book Thief reviewed by a kidTitle: The Book Thief

Author: Markus Zusak

Publisher: Picador

About the book: Set in Nazi Germany, this is a beautiful but haunting story.

Beside her brother’s grave, young Liesel Meminger picks up one, single, life-changing object. A book: ‘The Grave Digger’s Handbook’. This is her first act of book thievery and definitely not her last.

Stealing from Nazi book burnings, the mayor’s wife’s library and anywhere else she comes across books, Liesel goes to extreme heights to read.

What I thought: I really enjoyed the way this book was written. It made me feel like I was actually in the story. The way it was narrated was mysterious, which made it even more interesting.

I recommend it for ages 12+, and I think you would like this if you like the author Jackie French, or any historical fiction set in this era.

Review: Tiny Timmy: Soccer Superstar

Tiny Timmy review by kidTitle: Tiny Timmy: Soccer Superstar

Author: Tim Cahill

Publisher: Scholastic

When I received this book to review, I realised straight away that it would be perfect for my nine-year-old brother – he’s a soccer player and he likes funny books. So I asked him (let’s call him Book Boy Junior aka BBJ) to read it, and this is what he thought of Tiny Timmy: Soccer Superstar.

“I thought this book was really exciting. Being a soccer player and lover I really enjoyed how Timmy was always improving his game, and I liked the descriptions of the game. The book was easy to read and really well set out.

“The book was also funny – one example was when Timmy was the orange boy and he was walking down the street with the bag of oranges but there was a hole in the bag. As he walked, a dog came behind him and ate all of the oranges!

“I read a lot of the book aloud to my mum, and she thought it was good, too.

“I would recommend this book for 7-9 year olds who like soccer.”

Thank you BBJ!

Buy Tiny Timmy Soccer Superstar.