Review: Jasper Jones

jasper-jones by Craig Silvey reviewed by a kidTitle: Jasper Jones

Author: Craig Silvey

Publisher: Allen & Unwin

About the book: When Charlie Bucktin, a nerdy bookworm of 13, is woken by Jasper Jones, the outcast in their mining town of Corrigan, his whole life changes.

When they discover a dead body, Charlie carries the secret like a brick, not daring to tell anyone for fear of punishment. The story is set in the 1960s and outlines what happens after this event.

What I thought: I think that this is one of the best books I’ve ever read because it is so well-written and the story captures so many elements of everyday life mixed with a horrible tragedy.

I particularly like the character of Charlie’s best friend Jeffrey, and the conversations that the two boys have. Some of the themes talked about in the book include coming of age, secrets, friendship, knowing who to trust, perception and judgement.

I think this book is probably best suited to readers of 14+ as it contains some disturbing thoughts and heavy themes. It is one of the best books of all time.

Buy Jasper Jones here.

Review: KidGlovz

KidGlovz graphic novel review by kid book bloggerTitle: KidGlovz

Author: Julie Hunt

Illustrator: Dale Newman

Publisher: Allen & Unwin

About the book: In this graphic novel, KidGlovz is a musical prodigy with a gift so precious that he is kept under lock and key by his manager (also his uncle). When a thief helps him to escape, Kid must go on a dangerous journey, through which he will discover the terrifying nature of his talent.

What I thought: I thought that this was a great graphic novel because the illustrations are beautiful and the fact that it is all in black and white just adds to the texture of the book. The story is interesting and feels like a magical fable. Being a lover of music myself, I could really connect with the book.

I would recommend this book for ages 10+ as it contains some dark scenes. Kids who like music will love it, and even kids who don’t will still enjoy it.

Buy KidGlovz here.

Review: The 78-Storey Treehouse

The-78-storey-treehouse-reviewed-by-a-kid.jpgTitle: The 78-Storey Treehouse

Author: Andy Griffiths

Illustrator: Terry Denton

Publisher: Pan Macmillan Australia

About the book: Andy and Terry are back at it again in their ‘spectacular 78-storey treehouse’. They’ve added 13 new levels, including an all-ball sports stadium, a combining machine, a high-security potato chip storage facility and an open-air movie theatre.

When a big-shot Hollywood director decides to make a movie without Andy in it, trouble inevitably results.

What I thought: I thought that this was a good, light read. I’ve read all of the Treehouse series and this one does not fail to live up to the Andy Griffiths/Terry Denton humour, although I have to say that the illustrations are my favourite part of the books (sorry Andy!).

Fans will love the new book, and new readers will probably be begging to read the other five books in the Treehouse series. I recommend this book for ages 7+.

Buy The 78-Storey Treehouse here.

Review: Harry Potter and The Cursed Child

Harry Potter and The Cursed Child reviewed by a kidTitle: Harry Potter and The Cursed Child

Author: J.K.Rowling, John Tiffany & Jack Thorne (original story), Jack Thorne (play)

Publisher: Little, Brown

About the book: Written as a script, this book carries on from the original Harry Potter stories, but 19 years later. Albus Potter, Harry Potter’s son, is struggling, as is Harry.

Albus has found that he cannot do much magic and is finding it difficult to live up to his father’s legacy. While Harry tries to deal with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, both father and son will learn the truth, that darkness comes from unexpected places.

What I thought: This book has not failed to live up to the Harry Potter legacy and is as intriguing and captivating as the original series. I found that even though the book was a script it was not hard to follow.

I thought that the characters were nearly as good as the original trio of Harry, Ron and Hermione – although, during some parts of the book, I was left wondering how they would manage to do this as a stage production!

I think that kids will probably love the story and the format is not too difficult to understand. I recommend this book for ages 12+, but only if you’ve read the Harry Potter series first. It does contain some dark, scary scenes.

Buy Harry Potter And The Cursed Child here.

Review: The Other Christy

The Other Christy reviewed by a kidTitle: The Other Christy

Author: Oliver Phommavanh

Publisher: Penguin Books Australia

About the book: Christy is in a class with another girl called Christie. Christy doesn’t get noticed much whereas the other Christie is popular … and mean. Christy would like for just once to be noticed, and to have a real friend.

What I thought: This book was touching, funny and well written – it touches on themes of friendship, understanding and inclusion. I have read some of the author’s other books and thoroughly enjoyed them, mostly because of the humour and the themes of the story.

This book was similar, but written from the perspective of a girl, which gave it a different feel and would have been hard to do, given the author is male.

I would recommend this book for girls and boys, ages 9+.

Buy The Other Christy here.