Review: Adam Spencer’s Big Book Of Numbers

Adam Spencer's Big Book Of Numbers reviewed by a kid book bloggerTitle: Adam Spencer’s Big Book Of Numbers

Author: Adam Spencer

Publisher: Xoum

About the book: This book contains all the weird, wonderful and wacky facts about the numbers 1 to 100. It includes quizzes and problems so that you can test your maths skills as you learn.

What I thought: I thought this book was brilliantly surprising and funny. Yes, funny. Maths can be funny. I really thought that the addition of quizzes was helpful as it helps people to learn if they actually do it for themselves. This is the best non-fiction book that I’ve read.

I would recommend this book to everyone, although it would be helpful to be a little bit older (10+) as some of the problems are difficult. If you really like numbers, or you’d like to know more about them, you’ll love this book.

Younger readers may like to start off with Adam Spencer’s Enormous Book Of Numbers, which is aimed at the 7+ age group.

Buy Adam Spencer’s Big Book Of Numbers

Review: The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time

the-curious-incident-of-the-dog-in-the-night-time reviewed by a kidTitle: The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time

Author: Mark Haddon

Publisher: Vintage Children’s Classics

About the book: Christopher is 15 and has Asperger’s Syndrome. He knows a lot about maths and he likes counting and prime numbers. He also hates the colours yellow and brown.

When Christopher is on one of his late-night walks, he comes across a dead dog with a garden fork stuck in it and his whole world is turned upside-down.

What I thought: I thought that this book was unique, funny and clever. I liked how the story unfolded as you read. I particularly liked the character of Christopher, and his unusual perspective of the world.

The book is a mystery – in more ways than one – and, while it doesn’t go out of its way to be funny, it is.

I recommend this book for ages 14+ as it contains disturbing images, adult themes and coarse language.

Buy The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time.

Review: The 5th Wave

the 5th wave reviewed by a kid book bloggerTitle: The 5th Wave

Author: Rick Yancey

Publisher: Penguin Books

About the book: Sixteen-year-old Cassie is living through an alien invasion. So far there have been four waves of attacks, killing over four billion people. Now she’s on her own, and facing the fifth wave.

What I thought: This book sucked me in from the first page. It’s a fast-paced thriller that’s also thought-provoking. The plot unfolds cleverly as you read, making you want to read on and on.

I liked the character of Cassie because she likes books, to the point of making room in her survival kit for them. I also liked the first-person narration because it feels very immediate, like you’re experiencing the danger with her.

I recommend this book for ages 14+ because it has adult themes, violence, science fiction elements and it can be scary in places.

Buy The 5th Wave here.

Review: The Maze Runner

the maze runner book reviewed by a kidTitle: The Maze Runner

Author: James Dashner

Publisher: Random House

About the book: I thought I would review this book because ‘The Fever Code’, a second prequel to the original series, has just been released. 

When Thomas wakes up in a strange maze, the only thing he can remember is his first name. He’s welcomed by other boys into The Glade, a camp in the middle of the terrible maze. Like Thomas, the others do not know where they are, why they are there or how they got there.

What I thought: This was a tense, gripping book, which had me wanting to read more and more, as more questions were answered – opening up new questions. I really loved how this book kept me interested and the quality was the same the whole way through (the pace is kept up from start to finish).

I recommend this book for ages 12+ as it contains confronting scenes and some grown-up themes, and may be thought to be a bit scary in places.

Buy The Maze Runner here.

Buy The Fever Code here.