5 books ‘for girls’ that boys might like

5 books for girls that boys might like. A list from kid book blogger Book Boy | bookboy.com.auWhenever I write a book review where the main character is a girl, I get emails or comments about the fact that I’m a boy reading ‘books for girls’.

I don’t really think of it like that. To me, a good book is a good book.

Anyway, here’s a little round-up of some of those books. Your boys might like them, too.

Click the link to read my review.

The Other Christy (9+)

Friday Barnes Girl Detective (10+)

Counting by 7s (10+)

Thirst (10+)

The Stupendously Spectacular Spelling Bee (8+)

You might also like this post about books for boys featuring awesome girls – a list based on books that I had read and recommended.

Review: Chance Of A Lifetime

The Izzy Folau series, reviewed by a kidThis week’s book review comes from Book Boy Junior, aged 10.

Title: Chance Of A Lifetime (Izzy Folau series, book #1)

Author: David Harding with Izzy Folau

Publisher: Random House Australia

About the book: This book is about two very different boys in a rugby union rep team. One of them, Sione, doesn’t want to be there at all, while the other, Daniel, wants to win at all costs. The story is about what happens when they meet – and when they meet Wallabies player Izzy Folau.

What I thought: I really liked this book because I am playing my first season of rugby union. It’s very entertaining and exciting, because of the descriptions of the rugby games.

My favourite characters in the book were Sione, who is really calm and has a great step, and, of course, Izzy Folau, who even offers some training tips about passing in the book.

I would recommend this book for ages 8+. You don’t need to be interested in rugby union to enjoy it, but I think it would help.

Buy Chance Of A Lifetime here.

Review: Super Con-Nerd

Super Con-Nerd by Oliver Phommavanh reviewed by a kid book bloggerTitle: Super Con-nerd

Author: Oliver Phommavanh

Publisher: Penguin Books Australia

About the bookConnor has passed the entrance exam to the selective high school, where he thinks he will still be top of the class, but he is surprised to find that he is, for the first time ever, struggling with school work. He though he would be one of the nerdiest kids there, but there are other nerds, super nerds.

What I thought: This is the sequel to Con-nerd (first published in 2011 and read by me a few years ago), and directly follows the first book, so I would recommend reading book one first. Super Con-nerd has the same trademark humour as the first book.

I really enjoyed reading Super Con-nerd, although I have to admit I liked the first book more. I could really relate to the character of Connor, as I am quite a nerd myself.

I would recommend this book for ages 10+.

Buy Super Con-nerd here.

My top 10 book reviews in my first year of blogging

The top 10 book reviews from the first year of bookboy.com.auIn just a few weeks I will celebrate my blog’s first birthday! (I hope there will be cake…)

I thought I might turn it into a mini festival by mixing up my regular posts with a few lists from my first year of blogging.

Today, I’m sharing the top 10 most popular reviews on bookboy.com.au from the past 12 months – from number 10 down to my most popular review of all! Some are by me and some are by my minion brother Book Boy Junior.

Click on each link to read the full review for each book.

10. Bro by Helen Chebatte*

9. The Turners by Mick Elliott*

8. The Yearbook Committee by Sarah Ayoub*

7. Counting By 7s by Holly Goldberg Sloan

6. Artie And The Grime Wave by Richard Roxburgh*

5. Harry Potter And The Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling

4. Pax by Sara Pennypacker

3. Jasper Jones by Craig Silvey*

2. Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

And the winner of most popular review goes to…

1. The 78-Storey Treehouse by Andy Griffiths and Terry Denton*

*Australian author

Review: Pixel Raiders #1 (Dig World)

Pixel Raiders #1 Dig World reviewed by a kidBook Boy Junior is back this week with a review of a new book series that gamers will love!

Title: Pixel Raiders #1: Dig World

Author: Bajo & Hex (ill, Chris Kennett)

Publisher: Scholastic Australia

About the book: Pixel Raiders #1 is about a young boy named Rip and a young girl named Mei. They are sent to a gaming contest for school, and the winners get to play a new game that hasn’t yet been released. Rip and Mei are so eager to beat each other that they don’t realise that others are beating them, and they lose the competition.

When a mysterious parcel arrives, containing the new game and a VR headset, they put it on and don’t realise that they are trapped in the game, called Dig World.

What I thought: I enjoyed this book a lot! It might be scary for younger readers, with the realisation that Rip and Mei are trapped in the game, but it’s also very exciting. I liked how the story reminded me of Minecraft and those sorts of games, and I never wanted to stop reading because I wanted to find out what would happen. Because I read at night, it left me lying in bed wondering what would happen next.

My favourite character was Rip because he was always so brave, no matter what was happening.

I would recommend this book for ages 9+ as it can be a bit scary at times. If you like playing games, or the show Good Game (the authors are the presenters of that show), you would like this book.

I already have the second book in the Pixel Raiders series (Dragon Land) and can’t wait to read it!

Buy Pixel Raiders #1: Dig World at Booktopia

Find a new book: what to try next

I thought I might try something a bit different this week. Sometimes it’s hard to find your next read, so I’ve made a list of related books – if you like the first one, you might like the second one.

Find a new book: what to read next | bookboy.com.au - a 13yo book blogger - has some suggested reads for you

I’ve linked to reviews where I have them, or the link on each title will take you to Booktopia for more information and to buy if you’re interested.

If you likeThe Outsiders by S.E.Hinton The Outsiders by S.E.Hinton, reviewed by a kid book blogger

Review of The Outsiders

 

 

TryBro by Helen Chebattebook review Bro by Helen Chebatte, reviewed by a kid book blogger

Review of Bro

 

 

If you like… The Ranger’s Apprentice series by John Flanagan The Rangers Apprentice prequel Tournament at Gorlan reviewed by a kid book blogger.

Review of The Ranger’s Apprentice (prequel)

 

 

TryBrotherband by John Flanagan Brotherband series by John Flanagan, great read for kids

 

 

 

If you like… The Treehouse Series by Andy Griffiths and Terry Denton The 78-storey Treehouse by Andy Griffiths, reviewed by a kid book blogger

Review of The 78-Storey Treehouse

 

 

Try… Danny Best by Jen Storer and Mitch Vane Review of Danny Best: Never Wrong by Jen Storer, by a kid book blogger

Review of Danny Best Never Wrong

 

 

Or… Artie and The Grime Wave by Richard Roxburgh 

Book Boy, a kid book blogger, reviews Artie and The Grime Wave by Richard Roxburgh

Review of Artie and The Grime Wave

 

 

 

Or… the My Life series by Tristan Bancks and Gus Gordon My Life And Other Massive Mistakes by Tristan Bancks reviewed by a kid book blogger

Review of My Life And Other Massive Mistakes

 

 

Or… the Weirdo series by Anh Do and Jules Faber Review of Weirdo 3: Extra Weird by Anh Do and Jules Faber, by a kid book blogger

Review of Weirdo 3: Extra Weird

 

 

If you like… Friday Barnes by R.A. Spratt Friday Barnes Girl Detective reviewed by a kid book blogger

Review of Friday Barnes Girl Detective

 

 

Try… Encyclopaedia Brown by Donald J. Sobol Encyclopedia Brown Boy Detective is still loved by kids today, according to this kid book blogger

 

 

 

If you likeThe Maze Runner by  James Dashner The Maze Runner by James Dashner reviewed by a kid book blogger

Review of The Maze Runner

 

 

Try… Gone by Michael Grant The Gone series by Michael Grant, reviewed by a kid book blogger

Review of Gone

 

 

What are you reading at the moment? What do you plan to read next?

Q&A: Jules Faber, Illustrator

A Q&A with Jules Faber, illustrator of the Weirdo series This week, I’m doing something a little bit different, and I’m excited to present my first interview! Jules Faber, the illustrator for the bestselling Weirdo series (among other things), was kind enough to agree to be my first victim er, interviewee.

What made you get into illustration?

“When I was 4 years old, I lived in a family with five older brothers and two younger sisters. It was noisy and I didn’t always like it noisy. I discovered a television program called Mr Squiggle and watching him draw (with his nose!) on a board before a picture magically appeared out of a few lines was very exciting. I wanted to make that magic happen so I started drawing too. I haven’t stopped since!”

How long have you been professionally illustrating for?

“I started fulltime professional illustration in 2004 so this is my 13th year. I did it for many years before but it was more part-time but I did work fulltime in animation for a year in 2002.”

How did you go from it being a hobby to being a profession?

“I used to draw for fun and after seeing other people making comics and having fun doing it, the idea started to grow on me. I joined some web forums and the Australian Cartoonists Association and got excited about the possibility of doing it for a job, just as I had imagined I could way back when I was 10 years old!

“I went to college and studied Animation for three years before graduating and getting a job working on a Disney program (it was called The Proud Family). I did that for a year before realising that I wanted something with more variety. So I left and started working fulltime for myself. It also took a lot of practice over the years to get from hobby level to professional level.”

Do you have a favourite thing you like to draw?

“Of all things, I think I like to draw animals best. I used to draw them more realistically and find that really fun. But I also love illustrating kids’ books because I can have so much fun doing it. I usually have at least one book on the go at a time but sometimes as many as four!”

Has drawing for Weirdo been different to drawing for other projects?

“Most every project I work on is different from the others and Weirdo is no exception. Weirdo was my first foray into big league publishing, so I wanted to be extra careful while drawing it. That meant I did several drafts and it took me a while to visually represent some of the characters.

“Now things are different as I’ve done a lot of different sort of books since then. With my second series, the Kaboom Kid, I drew the characters in a totally different style so it didn’t just look like the Weirdo universe. Now I try to make each book look different but I think my own style still comes through anyway.”

Are you working on any new projects at the moment?

“As a general rule, I’m always working on new projects. in 2016 I drew eight books and a cover for another, which means I’m often working on books concurrently. At present though, since you asked, I am working on Weirdo 9 and The Stinky Street Stories 2.

“Coming up later this month I’ll be drawing my first book for grown-ups with Dr Karl Kruszelnicki (which is exciting, because I saw one of his books over 20 years ago and have wanted to draw one ever since. I actually credit Karl with inspiring me to consider illustrating books! So it’s one of those lovely life achievement moments where something comes full circle).”

Weirdo 8: Really Weird is out now! Buy it here.

You can find out more about Jules Faber on his website, here

Review: Gangsta Granny

Gangsta Granny by David Walliams, reviewed by a kid book bloggerBook Boy Jr (aged 10) is back this week to review a very funny book by David Walliams.

Title: Gangsta Granny

Author: David Walliams

Publisher: HarperCollins Children’s Books

About the book: This is a crime novel but with a twist because the criminal is none other than a Granny. Ben finds himself trapped in a world of surprises and mystery after he discovers his Granny is a thief.

What I thought: This book twists and turns from page one to the very end. It is very enjoyable because a) it’s good to find a new author that I like and this is the first David Walliams book that I have read (not the last!) and b) it is VERY funny.

There are some illustrations, to help keep things even more interesting, and the story is very fast-paced. My favourite character is Granny, because she reminds me of my Gran (not because my Gran is a thief but because she’s very exciting and fun to be with).

I would recommend the book for boys and girls who are aged 8-10. If you liked Artie and The Grime Wave by Richard Roxburgh, you would like this book.

Buy Gangsta Granny.

Review: The Stupendously Spectacular Spelling Bee

Book Review: The Stupendously Spectacular Spelling Bee reviewed by a kid book blogger | bookboy.com.auTitle: The Stupendously Spectacular Spelling Bee

Author: Deborah Abela

Publisher: Random House Australia

About the book: India Wimple watches The Stupendously Spectacular Spelling Bee on TV every Friday night. When India’s family suggests that she enter, she is nervous and shy, but throughout the course of the Bee she gains confidence, makes new friends and learns that sometimes you need to take risks.

What I thought: I thought this book was funny and interesting. I liked the voice of the book, which made it feel real. I liked the character of India because she reminded me of myself and my friends. Some of the spelling words were quite challenging.

I think this book is a good, easy, entertaining read that boys and girls would both like. I would recommend this book for ages 8+.

Buy The Stupendously Spectacular Spelling Bee.

Review: Danny Best Never Wrong

Review of Danny Best: Never Wrong by a kid book bloggerThis week’s book review is brought to you by Book Boy Junior (aged 9).

Title: Danny Best: Never Wrong

Author: Jen Storer (Illustrated by Mitch Vane)

Publisher: HarperCollins Children’s Books

About the book: This book is about a kid named Danny Best and he has lots of crazy adventures with his friends, such as spying on girls and writing a story that’s about lizard people that spit acid out of their eyeballs. The book is divided into lots of funny little stories with a quiz at the end of each one.

What I thought: I really liked this book. Each of the stories is different, and totally unrelated to the one before it – except that Danny is the star of all of them. The quizzes are challenging sometimes, particularly if you don’t read the whole story in one night. Danny is a very ‘out there’ character who gets away with crazy stuff.

I would recommend this book for boys and girls aged 7+. If you like Anh Do books or the Diary Of A Wimpy Kid series by Jeff Kinney you will probably like this book.

Buy Danny Best: Never Wrong.